Coronavirus
COVID-19 Updates

Los Angeles County:

HEALTH OFFICER ORDER

TRAVEL ADVISORY

  • December 2: Los Angeles County Reports First Case of the Omicron Variant
    The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (Public Health) has received confirmation of its first case of COVID-19 with mutations consistent with the new Omicron variant (B.1.1.529). The individual returned to Los Angeles County after travel to South Africa via London on 11/22/2021. This infection is most likely travel-related.

  • Preparing for the Omicron Variant
    While the Delta variant remains the dominate variant detected among Los Angeles County residents and continues to account for 100% of cases sequenced, the Omicron variant (B.1.1.529) identified by the World Health Organization in South Africa as a “variant of concern” is being closely monitored. The first confirmed case of the Omicron variant was detected in California on December 1.

    Although more studies are needed to determine whether the Omicron variant is more contagious, more deadly or resistant to vaccine and treatments than other COVID-19 strains, as with any variant of concern that is found in other countries, there are important steps we all need to take to protect ourselves from COVID-19 and from emerging variants of concern.

    The most important strategy remains making sure that everyone 5 years and older gets fully vaccinated or receives their booster dose as quickly as possible to reduce transmission of the virus currently dominating across the county. The vaccines are effective against the Delta variant and earlier strains of the virus which allows us to remain hopeful that the approved vaccines will also provide some protection against Omicron.

    However, given that there continues to be substantial transmission of COVID-19 and we have uncertainty about the level of vaccine efficacy against this new variant of concern, all residents across the County need to be sure to adhere to the masking requirements and wear a mask when indoors or at large outdoor mega events regardless of vaccination status. The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (Public Health) continues to strongly recommend that individuals wear a mask when at any crowded indoor or outdoor events. Residents are reminded that they are legally required to isolate if they have a positive COVID-19 test result and that vaccinated close contacts with symptoms and unvaccinated close contacts need to quarantine. Testing is an important tool in early detection of infection to reduce spread and Public Health encourages residents who have traveled for the holidays to get tested if they traveled internationally or to locations in this country with high transmission rates, or they participated at gatherings and events with large numbers of people, some of which may be unvaccinated.  

  • Update on Variants in Los Angeles County (as of November 18): The Delta variant emerged in late May, quickly dominated the scene and remains the predominate variant detected among our residents. It accounts for 100% of cases sequenced.

  • Beginning November 4, proof of full vaccination and photo ID for indoor entry into bars, breweries, wineries, distilleries, nightclubs, and lounges for all patrons and employees goes into effect. Patrons now need to be fully vaccinated to be indoors at any of these establishments.

    Next week, on November 8, the City of Los Angeles’ vaccine verification program, called SafePassLA, goes into effect, and will require proof of full vaccination for entry into the indoor portions of restaurants, bars, coffee shops, breweries, wineries, gyms, spas, nail salons, barbershops, movie theaters, shopping malls, and entertainment and recreation venues. This includes indoor portions of City facilities such as LA City Hall, senior centers, recreation centers, and service centers. 

    Public Health will be working closely with the City of LA to educate businesses and residents on the requirements of the SafePassLA program throughout the upcoming month and will unveil a virtual training and certificate program for LA City businesses next week. 

  • Los Angeles County Department of Public Health Provides Framework for Lifting Masking Requirements at Events and Indoor Establishments 
    • For outdoor mega events involving more than 10,000 people, before masking requirements are lifted, all of the following criteria need to be met:
      • Los Angeles County case rates must demonstrate three consecutive weeks at or below moderate transmission as defined by the CDC – that is, less than 50 new weekly cases per 100,000 residents;
      • Hospitalizations remain low and stable at or below 600 daily COVID-19 hospitalizations for three consecutive weeks;
      • 80% or more of County residents 12 and older are fully vaccinated;
      • And there are no emerging reports of significantly circulating new variants of concern that threaten vaccine effectiveness.
    • For masking requirements to be lifted at indoor events or establishments involving fewer than 1,000 people, including indoor offices and worksites, sites must have a vaccination verification process in place, and all employees and customers must be fully vaccinated, accommodating with additional requirements those employees with approved exemptions. Additionally, Los Angeles County metrics must meet all of the same standards as for lifting masking requirements at outdoor mega events.
    • Indoor masking will remain mandatory due to federal and state requirements on public transit and transportation hubs (federal), and at TK-12 schools, childcare and youth settings; healthcare settings; correctional facilities; homeless and emergency shelters and cooling centers; and indoor mega events involving more than 1,000 people (state).
  • On September 28, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health updated the Health Officer Order, which goes into effect October 7. It clarifies that starting November 1, 2021, operators of Outdoor Mega Events are required to cross-check proof of full vaccination or negative COVID-19 viral test result against a photo identification for all attendees who are 18 years of age or older.


California:

  • State Vaccine Mandate for Schools
    Under a state order, K-12 school staff across the county are required to be vaccinated by October 15 or test weekly. Governor Newsom announced the state’s plan to require COVID-19 vaccination of all students and staff at private and public schools statewide as a condition of in-person attendance. The requirement will be effective for each student beginning the term following full FDA approval of the vaccine for their grade span, beginning with students in grades 7-12, followed by students in grades K- 6. Depending on the timing of approvals, this likely means the requirement will go into effect beginning either January 1 or July 1 of 2022.

  • On August 5, 2021, the California Department of Public Health issued a State Public Health Officer Order requiring everyone who works in a health care facility to be vaccinated against COVID-19. Workers must have received their final dose of a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine series or the single dose of a one-dose COVID-19 vaccine by September 30, 2021. Exemptions from the vaccine requirement are permitted only for religious beliefs or qualifying medical conditions. Additional guidance from the Department is anticipated. The full Health Officer Order can be found here.


    United States:

    • Path Out of the Pandemic: President Biden’s COVID-19 Action Plan

      President Biden is implementing a six-pronged, comprehensive national strategy that employs the same science-based approach that was used to successfully combat previous variants of COVID-19 earlier this year. This plan will ensure that we are using every available tool to combat COVID-19 and save even more lives in the months ahead, while also keeping schools open and safe, and protecting our economy from lockdowns and damage. Learn more here.

    • Federal Health Officials Plan for Booster Shot This Fall

      Federal health officials have developed a plan to begin offering COVID-19 vaccine booster shots this fall, pending final FDA evaluation of third doses of the Moderna mRNA vaccine and formal recommendations from CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). The Pfizer mRNA vaccine is already approved and being offered as a third dose in LA county to qualifying groups. 

      Highlights of the plan:

      • They are prepared to offer booster shots for all Americans beginning the week of September 20 and starting 8 months after an individual’s second dose.
      • At that time, the individuals who were fully vaccinated earliest in the vaccination rollout, including many health care providers, nursing home residents, and other seniors, will likely be eligible for a booster.
      • They would also begin efforts to deliver booster shots directly to residents of long-term care facilities at that time, given the distribution of vaccines to this population early in the vaccine rollout and the continued increased risk that COVID-19 poses to them.
      • They also anticipate booster shots will likely be needed for people who received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine. Administration of this vaccine did not begin in the United States until March 2021, and they expect more data on it in the next few weeks.
        Read the joint statement here.
    • On August 13, 2021:CDC now recommends that people whose immune systems are compromised moderately to severely should receive an additional dose of mRNA COVID-19 vaccine after the initial 2 doses. Widespread vaccination is a critical tool to help stop the pandemic. Read CDC’s statement.

      • People who are moderately to severely immunocompromised are especially vulnerable to COVID-19 because they are more at risk of serious, prolonged illness.
      • People who have compromised immune systems may benefit from an additional dose to make sure they have enough protection against COVID-19.
      • CDC recommends people who are moderately to severely immunocompromised should receive an additional dose of mRNA COVID-19 vaccine after the initial 2 doses.
      • CDC recommends that people with moderately to severely compromised immune systems receive an additional dose of mRNA COVID-19 vaccine at least 28 days after a second dose of Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine. CDC does not recommend additional doses or booster shots for any other population at this time.
    • On August 12, 202: FDA Authorized Additional Vaccine Dose for Certain Immunocompromised Individuals. Read the press release.
    • On July 27, the CDC updated its masking guidance in response to new science related to the Delta variant. In areas with substantial and high transmission, CDC recommends fully vaccinated people wear masks in public, indoor settings to help prevent the spread of the Delta variant and protect others. The agency is also recommending that everyone in grade schools wear masks indoors, including teachers, staff, students and visitors, regardless of vaccination status.

     

    Past Updates
    LA County
    • Indoor Large Events Required to Verify Vaccination or Negative Test for Entry
      As of September 20, the State requires that all attendees at indoor mega events show proof of full vaccination or a negative test result prior to entry. Self-attestation can no longer be used to verify an attendee's status as fully vaccinated or as proof of a negative COVID-19 test result.  

      ​Indoor mega events are events with 1,000 or more attendees indoors and include conventions, conferences, expos, concerts, shows, nightclubs, sporting events, live entertainment and festivals.

      • Acceptable proof of vaccination status includes a photo identification with any one of the following:
        • CDC COVID-19 vaccination record card (white card)
        • World Health Organization (WHO) vaccine record card (yellow card)
        • California Department of Public Health (CDPH) COVID-19 digital vaccination record
        • Other COVID-19 digital vaccination record issued by an approved company
        • Documentation of vaccination from the healthcare provider or entity that provided the COVID-19 vaccines
        • California Immunization Registry (CAIR2) vaccination record
      • The vaccination proof should include the person’s name, type of COVID-19 vaccine and the date of the doses administered. The person can show the vaccination card, a photo of the card as a separate document or a photo of the card stored on a phone or electronic device.
      • ​Acceptable proof of a negative test includes a photo identification with testing results that must include the person’s name, type of COVID-19 viral test performed and negative test result. The date when the COVID-19 test was taken must be within the 72 hours prior to the event. The test results can be a printed copy or on a phone, including an email or text message results from the test provider or laboratory.
    • Updated Health Officer Order on Vaccination Verifications
      On September 17, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health issued an updated Health Officer Order, which goes into effect on October 7.

      Brief Highlights:

      • Aligns with the State’s September 8, 2021, definition of Outdoor Mega Events
        • Beginning October 7, 2021, all attendees, ages 12 and over, at Outdoor Mega Events involving 10,000 or more persons must, prior to entry, show proof of full vaccination against COVID-19 or a pre-entry negative COVID-19 (diagnostic) test result. Self-attestation is not a permitted method for verification of vaccination or test result.
        • Beginning October 7, 2021, requires bars, breweries, wineries, distilleries, nightclubs and lounges for indoor service and operations to verify the COVID-19 vaccination status of their patrons and employees.
          • Requires that all customers and employees have at least one dose of the vaccine by October 7 and full vaccination by November 4.
          • These establishments primarily serve adults and already require patrons to show proof of age; and while children do not usually enter these establishments, children under 12 are exempt from these requirements.
        • The County Health Officer strongly recommends that beginning October 7, 2021, that the operators of all restaurants and food facilities reserve and prioritize indoor seating/service for those who are fully vaccinated against COVID-19.
          • Full vaccination verification for services in the indoor portions of restaurants is strongly recommended.
      • Verifying Proof of a Negative COVID-19 Test
      • Verifying Proof of COVID-19 Vaccination
    • Modified Quarantine Option for K-12 Students Exposed to COVID-19 at School
      On September 16, after reviewing four weeks’ worth of data related to cases, close contacts and outbreaks at schools, and with relatively low transmission at schools, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health is offering a modified quarantine option for K-12 students exposed to COVID-19 at school under certain circumstancesSchools and school districts are not required to offer a modified quarantine option to their students and may choose to continue with the customary quarantine requirements.  

      Modified quarantine allows, under certain conditions, an unvaccinated student with an exposure to a confirmed COVID-19 case to continue in-person instruction at school during their quarantine, while restricting their activities outside of the classroom. Those who qualify for modified quarantine include close contacts whose exposure took place at school or a school supervised activity when both the contact and the case were masked during the entire exposure period and the close contacts are not part of a defined outbreak. The exposed student must remain asymptomatic for the duration of quarantine, stay home except for classroom and educational instruction activities and continue to wear a mask indoors, outdoors and on the school bus, except for when they are eating and drinking. While eating and drinking, they must maintain at least a six-foot distance from others; this should ideally take place outdoors. Students in modified quarantine must also be tested twice a week during their quarantine: the first test should be on day one through two after exposure, while the second test should be five days after exposure. Modified quarantine ends when a second test done at least five days after exposure is negative. In this scenario, the exposed student can end modified quarantine after day seven.

    • Los Angeles County to Modify Health Officer Order Adding Vaccination Verification Requirements at Select High-Risk Settings
      With the urgent need to reduce transmission risk and increase vaccination coverage in Los Angeles County, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health will begin requiring verification of vaccination in select high-risk settings by October 7, 2021.

      The Department of Public Health will issue a modified Health Officer Order later this week that would align with President Biden and require vaccination verification or a negative test within 72 hours prior to attending outdoor mega events. Attendees at indoor mega events are already required to show proof of vaccination or a negative test result prior to entry. Many mega event venues already established verification systems during the spring in response to previous capacity restrictions, and the Department of Public Health is prepared to offer all large venues and organizers of mega events technical assistance to assist with implementation. 

      Vaccine verification will also be required for customers and employees at indoor portions of bars, wineries, breweries, night clubs and lounges. These establishments are primarily attended by adults and already require patrons to show identification. The Department of Public Health will prepare a toolkit to assist businesses in confirming vaccinations and will provide education and support to those establishments requesting assistance. While not required, vaccine verification at indoor portions of restaurants are also recommended.

      The modified Health Officer Order would require customers and employees at bars, breweries, wineries, night clubs and lounges to have at least one dose of the vaccine by October 7 and both doses by November 4.

    • Update on Variants in Los Angeles County (as of September 10): The Delta variant now accounts for 100% of the COVID-19 strains seen among samples sequenced in the Los Angeles County area. This variant is more infectious and more efficiently transmitted between people compared with earlier COVID-19 strains. While emerging data affirms that fully vaccinated people are well protected from severe infections with Delta variants, it now is clear that fully vaccinated people can become infected, and if infected with Delta, can infect others.

      As a result of re-analyzing many samples with an updated version of the genetic library used to identify variants, a lab that performs much of the variant sequencing reclassified many older specimens as Mu or Lambda variants, resulting in an increase in the total number of these variants reported linked to County residents. To date, 232 cases linked to Mu variants and 28 cases linked to Lambda variants have been identified. Most of those specimens were collected earlier in the summer.

    • September 7, 2021: COVID-19 Cases Among Healthcare Workers Decline: Reflecting the recent overall trend in Los Angeles County, cases among healthcare workers increased in early June through early August and have begun to decline over the past several weeks. During the week ending August 7, there were 534 new cases of COVID-19 among healthcare workers. During the week ending September 2, there were 291 new cases among healthcare workers reported across the county; 178 cases were reported among vaccinated healthcare workers and 113 among unvaccinated workers. 

    • September 4, 2021: COVID-19 Hospitalizations Drop Under 1,600: There are 1,593 people with COVID-19 currently hospitalized, a decrease of 115 people over the past week and the first time daily hospitalizations dropped under 1,600 since August 11. These declines are welcomed news and may reflect both the decline in new cases and the likelihood that cases among fully vaccinated individuals are not as likely as cases among unvaccinated individuals to require hospitalization.

    • September 2, 2021 Update: While transmission in L.A. County remains at a high level, the 7-day cumulative case rate decreased 16% from last week to 159 new cases per 100,000 residents. This is the second week in a row with small decreases in the County’s case rate. Overall, the County has seen a 22% decrease from the peak of 204 cases per 100,000 on August 19. Ensuring vaccine access to vulnerable residents is one of Public Health’s highest priorities, and the County’s in-home vaccination program offers home visits to provide vaccines to those unable to leave their homes. The County has so far vaccinated 2,000 homebound residents through this program to date, and the County is also offering additional doses for immunocompromised residents through this program. Residents who are homebound can refer themselves to this program. Caregivers, family members and loved ones, healthcare providers, organizations, and others can also make referrals. On the vaccine website, residents who are homebound can click “In-home vaccination” in the menu to submit a request, or call us at 1-833-540-0473 between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 8:30 p.m. seven days a week. Public Health is able to take calls in multiple languages.

    • Los Angeles County to Modify Health Officer Order on Youth Sports
      Los Angeles County will modify the Health Officer Order to update youth sports testing requirements for vaccinated and unvaccinated athletes, staff, coaches and volunteers.

      The County continues to recommend weekly testing for unvaccinated participants in youth sports. The following applies to teams and sport activities based in Los Angeles County and relaxes some screening testing:

      • Indoor Moderate or High Risk Sports for children of all ages, staff, coaches and volunteers. A weekly negative test result is required for all participants who are not fully vaccinated, including children who are playing, staff, coaches and volunteers; weekly school testing fulfills this obligation.
      • Outdoor Moderate or High Risk Sports for youth 12 and older, staff, coaches and volunteers. A weekly negative test result is required for all participants 12 and older who are not fully vaccinated, including children who are playing, staff, coaches and volunteers; weekly school testing fulfills this obligation.
      • No screening testing required for children under 12 playing Outdoor Sports; weekly school testing fulfills this recommendation.
      • These requirements may be modified based on the availability of and access to testing and will be reassessed when community transmission is no longer high. The youth sports guidelines will be posted here.

      • Fully vaccinated youth participating in outdoor sports are not required to test weekly unless there is a positive case among players, coaches and/or staff.  If there is a positive case, all players, coaches, staff and volunteers (regardless of vaccination status) are required to have a weekly negative test result for two weeks from exposure to the case and must test negative prior to competitions.

        These requirements may be modified based on the availability of and access to testing and will be reassessed when community transmission is no longer high. The youth sports guidelines will be posted here.

    • On August 23, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health issued an updated Health Officer Order with the following changes:

      • Aligns with the State Public Health Officer’s August 18, 2021 Order Beyond the Blueprint for Industry and Business Sectors regarding Indoor Mega Events.
        • Beginning September 20, 2021, all attendees at Indoor Mega Events involving 1,000 or more persons must, prior to entry, show verification of COVID-19 vaccination status or a negative COVID-19 (diagnostic) test result. This is a lower attendance threshold than the previous requirement of 5,000 participants.
        • Clarifies that for all Indoor Mega Events scheduled on or after September 20, 2021, self-attestation is no longer a permitted method for vaccine verification or verification of negative COVID-19 test.
      • Requires specific infection control protocols for Youth Sports effective September 1, 2021, attached to this Order as Appendix S.
    • On August 16, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health issued an updated Health Officer Order with the following changes effective as of 11:59 p.m. on August 19 for Outdoor Mega Events.

      • Requires all persons at an Outdoor Mega Event to wear a face mask, except when actively eating or drinking.
      • Clarifies that “actively eating or drinking” is the limited time during which the mask can be removed briefly to eat or drink, and that it must be immediately put back on afterward.
      • Outdoor mega events are outdoor events with crowds greater than 10,000 attendees and include music or food festivals, car shows, large endurance events, marathons, parades, sporting events and concerts.
    • On August 13, 2021

      Following the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) approval of an additional dose of the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines for immunocompromised people, Los Angeles County has begun administering third doses to those who qualify. The FDA has amended the Emergency Use Authorization for these vaccines to allow for a third dose which can be administered at least 28 days following the second dose of the vaccine.

      Ideally, individuals should be vaccinated with the same vaccine they received for the first and second dose, but if that is not possible, receiving a third dose with another mRNA vaccine is acceptable.

      Although the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines work very well in the majority of individuals, there is evidence that individuals who are severely immunocompromised are not fully protected after receiving two doses and this small, vulnerable group may benefit from a third dose. Certain medical conditions or the treatments used for specific conditions may prevent the immune system from responding adequately to two doses of the vaccine and therefore require an additional dose to provide adequate protection from COVID-19. Individuals who qualify for a third dose include organ transplant recipients, people undergoing cancer treatment, people with advanced or untreated HIV and those on certain immunosuppressive medications.

      The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (Public Health) encourages individuals who qualify for a third dose to speak to their healthcare provider to confirm their eligibility and get vaccinated. Third doses of the vaccines will be accessible through vaccination sites that currently offer Pfizer or Moderna vaccines.  Eligible individuals will be able to provide a self-attestation that they have a qualifying medical condition at these sites.

      A follow-up dose is not currently recommended for those who have received a single dose of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine.  The FDA is still evaluating data on the effectiveness of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine in immunocompromised individuals.  COVID-19 vaccine booster doses are also not recommended for the general public at this time. CDC does not recommend additional doses or booster shots for any other population at this time.

    • Update on the Delta Variant in Los Angeles County (as of September 3): The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (Public Health) continues to track variant cases in Los Angeles County. While the most dominant circulating variant in L.A. County continues to be the highly transmissible Delta variant, a variant of concern, the Mu variant, a variant of interest, is being closely monitored.  To date, Public Health has identified 167 Mu variants in L.A. County; these specimens were sequenced between June 19 and Augusts 21, with the majority of Mu specimens sequenced in July.

      Mu was first identified in Colombia in January 2021 and has since been reported in 39 countries. The World Health Organization labelled variant Mu, lineage B.1.621, as a variant of interest on August 30, 2021. The Mu variant is found to have key mutations linked to greater transmissibility and the potential to evade antibodies.  More studies are needed to determine whether Mu variant is more contagious, more deadly or more resistant to vaccine and treatments than other COVID-19 strains.

    • Healthcare workers have been among Los Angeles County’s highest-risk populations for COVID-19 infections since the beginning of the pandemic. As PPE became more widely available and vaccinations increased among healthcare workers, their infection rates declined earlier this year. However, the County is now seeing transmission rise in this group. Between July 25-31, 268 healthcare workers and first responders tested positive for COVID-19. 

      Healthcare workers are not uniformly vaccinated, and while consistent use of respirators and PPE reduces the likelihood of transmission within healthcare settings, unvaccinated workers are still at higher risk for being infected in their communities when community transmission is high. Because many healthcare workers have close contact with very vulnerable patients, it is therefore of particular importance to prevent infection in healthcare workers: the better protected they are, the safer it is for the vulnerable people they care for and the easier it is to ensure that healthcare facilities are able to remain fully staffed during the pandemic.

      Given the need to protect healthcare workers and the populations they care for, on August 12, Los Angeles County issued a Health Officer Order (click for link) to align with State Orders that mandate vaccinations for healthcare workers by September 30. The County Order also includes three additional groups of healthcare workers: emergency medical technicians and paramedics, home healthcare workers, and dental practice employees. This Order applies to volunteers, contractors and students, in addition to part- and full-time employees and health care facilities. Exemptions to this requirement will be allowed only for qualifying medical or religious reasons, and exempt workers must be tested one to two times a week depending on the type of facility in which they work. Additionally, exempt workers must wear respiratory protection at all times. This can be in the form of medical grade masks or respirators such as N95s.

      The State also requires visitors to healthcare facilities, including visiting staff, to show proof of full vaccination or a negative test in the prior 72 hours upon visitation. The Order also mandates masking regardless of vaccination status and recommends a medical-grade mask or double masking. Additional restrictions may apply, so visitors should consult with the facility in advance for further instructions.

    • On July 30, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health updated the Health Officer Order with the following changes effective as of 11:59 p.m. on July 31:

      • Incorporates by reference, the July 26, 2021 State Public Health Officer Order that mandates specific public health requirements regarding worker vaccine status, respirators or masks and testing requirements for Acute Health Care and Long-Term Care settings, High-Risk Congregate Settings and Other Health Care Settings.
      • Reiterates that because the County is currently experiencing high rates of COVID-19 community transmission, all persons, in indoor public and business settings, must wear a face mask regardless of vaccination status.
    • Update on the Delta Variant in Los Angeles County (as of July 29): Specimens sequenced by several labs serving Southern California, including the Los Angeles County Public Health lab show the Delta variant is on the rise. Sequences collected between July 18-24 show that the Delta variant was isolated in 96% of the 675 specimens sequenced that week. This is consistent with the rise of Delta nationwide and CDC estimates. This now-predominant strain is more efficiently transmitted between people, likely due to its faster replication, higher viral load and greater affinity for lower respiratory tract cells compared with earlier COVID-19 strains.

      The science on this variant shows that it is different from earlier variants of COVID-19: it replicates faster and more efficiently in respiratory tract cells, which means that infected people may now spread up to 1,000 times more virus particles with every cough, sneeze or shout than they did a year ago. They may also spread the virus efficiently 2 days earlier in their illness course than did people who were infected a year ago. A more infectious variant indicates infected people have more opportunities to transmit the virus and can do so more efficiently before they realize they were even exposed. And while vaccinated people are extremely unlikely to get severely ill from COVID-19, there is a small risk of getting infected and transmitting the virus. This is why the Department of Public Health is asking everyone to wear a mask indoors, regardless of vaccination status.

    • On July 22, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health updated the Health Officer Order with the following changes:
      • Clarifies that customers, guests and patrons are not required to wear a face mask indoors while actively eating or drinking in a stationary place, receiving a personal care services that requires the removal of their mask, or when alone in a room or office.
      • Strongly recommends that all persons at Outdoor Mega-Events wear a face mask at all times when not seated in their ticketed seat.
      • Clarifies that persons in indoor private office settings need to wear a face mask. 
    • Update on the Delta Variant in Los Angeles County (as of July 22): While emerging data affirms that fully vaccinated people are well protected from severe infections with Delta variants, people with only one vaccine are not as well-protected, and there is increased evidence that a small number of fully vaccinated individuals can become infected and may be able to infect others. From July 11-17, the number of sequenced Delta variants was 201, 84% of all sequences collected that week. This is consistent with the rise of Delta nationwide: earlier this week, the CDC estimated that Delta strains accounted for 83% of circulating COVID-19. Given that about 4 million residents in the County are not yet vaccinated, the risk of increased spread of this variant within the County remains high.

    • Due to increased transmission, masks are required indoors at public settings and businesses regardless of vaccination status starting 11:59 p.m. on Saturday, July 17.  The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health expects to keep this order in place until we begin to see improvements in our community transmission of COVID-19. Read the Health Officer Order HERE.

      When people wear a mask correctly, they protect others as well as themselves. Consistent and correct mask use is especially important indoors and outdoors when in close contact with (less than six feet from) others who are not fully vaccinated against COVID-19 or whose vaccination status is unknown.
       
      Masks are required for everyone, regardless of COVID-19 vaccination status, in the following settings:
      • On public transit (examples: airplanes, ships, ferries, trains, subways, buses, taxis, and ride-shares)
      • In transportation hubs (examples: airport, bus terminal, marina, train station, seaport or other port, subway station, or any other area that provides transportation),
      • Indoors in K-12 schools, childcare and other youth settings. (Note: This may change as updated State K-12 school guidance is forthcoming, pending updates for K-12 operational guidance from the CDC.),
      • Healthcare settings (including long term care facilities),
      • State and local correctional facilities and detention centers,
      • Homeless shelters, emergency shelters, and cooling centers, and
      • All indoor public settings, venues, gatherings, and businesses (examples:offices, retail, restaurants, theaters, family entertainment centers, meetings, and state and local government offices serving the public, among others.)
       
      Recommendation: In indoor public and private settings where there is close contact with other people who may not be fully vaccinated, individuals should consider wearing a highler level of protection, such as wearing two masks ("double masking") or a wearing a respirator (e.g., KN95 or N95). This is particularly important if an individual is not fully vaccinated and is in an indoor or crowded outdoor setting.

      Individuals, businesses, venue operators or hosts of public indoor settings must:

      • Require all patrons to wear masks for all indoor settings, regardless of their vaccination status; and
      • Post clearly visible and easy to read signage, with or without having an employee present, at all entry points for indoor and outdoor settings to communicate the masking requirements for patrons.

      Special considerations are made for people with communication difficulties or certain disabilities. Clear masks or cloth masks with a clear plastic panel that fit well are an alternative type of mask for people who interact with: people who are deaf or hard of hearing, children or students learning to read, people learning a new language, and people with disabilities.

      All businesses, venue operators or hosts must implement measures to clearly communicate to non-employees the masking requirements on their premises.

      • No person can be prevented from wearing a mask as a condition of participation in an activity or entry into a business.
      • The categories of persons who are exempt from mask requirements remain unchanged at this time and can be found at http://www.publichealth.lacounty.gov/acd/ncorona2019/masks/#notwear. In workplaces, certain employees may be exempt from wearing a mask when performing specific tasks which cannot feasibly be performed while wearing a mask. This exception is limited to the period of time in which such tasks are actually being performed. Workers who cannot feasibly wear a mask while performing their work must be tested for COVID-19 at least twice per week, unless the employer is provided proof against COVID-19 or proof of recovery from laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 within the past 90 days against COVID-19.
      • In workplaces, most employers and businesses are subject to the Cal/OSHA COVID-19 Emergency Temporary Standards (ETS) and some to the Cal/OSHA Aerosol Transmissible Diseases Standards, and should consult those regulations for additional applicable requirements. The ETS allow local health jurisdictions to require more protective mandates. This County Health Officer Order, which requires masking of all individuals at indoor public settings and businesses, regardless of vaccination status, is a such a mandate in Los Angeles County, and overrides the more permissive ETS regarding employee masking.
      • All employers and businesses subject to Cal/OSHA must review and comply with the active Cal/OSHA COVID-19 Prevention Emergency Temporary Standards (ETS). As approved and effective, the full text of the COVID-19 Prevention emergency standards will be listed under Title 8, Subchapter 7, sections 3205-3205.4 of the California Code of Regulations. All businesses or employers with independent contractors should also review the State Labor Office webpage entitled, "Independent Contractor Versus Employee."
    • Update on the Delta Variant in Los Angeles County (as of July 15): Tracking the proliferation of the Delta variant is a priority because the Delta variant is more easily spread between people – more than other variants of concern. And while emerging data affirms that fully vaccinated people are well protected from severe infections with Delta variants, people with only one vaccine are not as well-protected, and there is evidence that a very small number of fully vaccinated individuals can become infected and may be able to infect others. From June 27-July 3, the number of sequenced Delta variants was 124, 71% of all sequences collected that week. Given that slightly under 4 million residents in the County are not yet vaccinated, the risk of increased spread of this variant within the County remains high. 

    • Update on the Delta Variant in Los Angeles County (as of July 8): With the recent rise in cases, tracking the proliferation of variants of concern remains a priority to better understand the factors that may be contributing to increased community transmission. The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health is closely watching for Delta variants which were first detected in India, and are now estimated to comprise about half of U.S. cases.
      The Delta variant has been the most commonly sequenced variant in Los Angeles County since the beginning of June, now accounting for the majority of variants of concern identified by labs. From June 20-26, the number of sequenced Delta variants was 63, 54% of all sequences collected that week. The rising proportion of Delta among sequenced variants of concern is consistent with what other parts of the U.S. are seeing, and represents increased circulation of the variant. Given that slightly under 4 million residents in the County are not yet vaccinated, the risk of increased spread remains high. The data to date suggests fully vaccinated people are well protected from severe infections with the Delta variant. 

    • On June 28, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health updated the Health Officer Order for a Safer Return Together at Work and in the Community to require masks for everyone, regardless of COVID-19 vaccination status, at an additional setting – any business or government office serving the public that requires everyone to wear a mask.

    • Fully vaccinated people appear to be well protected from infections with Delta variants, however people with only one vaccine dose of Pfizer or Moderna are not as well-protected. The smaller number of COVID-19 infections identified in people who are fully vaccinated have been mild illnesses. Until the Department of Public Health better understands how and to who the Delta variant is spreading, everyone should focus on maximum protection with minimum interruption to routine as all businesses operate without other restrictions, like physical distancing and capacity limits. The CDC noted that Delta variants are now responsible for about one in every five new infections across the country, up from approximately one in every 10 the week before.

    • Nearly All Cases, Hospitalizations and Deaths in Los Angeles County Occurring in those Unvaccinated: From December 7, 2020, when vaccinations first became available, to June 7, 2021, 99.6% of the County’s nearly 437,000 COVID-19 cases were individuals who were unvaccinated. There were nearly 12,900 COVID-19 hospitalizations over this time period, 98.7% occurred among people who were unvaccinated.  Among the 12,234 COVID-19 deaths across L.A. County during this period, 99.8% were among unvaccinated people.

      After a period of persistent declines in many metrics, L.A. County is starting to see small increases in cases, hospitalizations, and daily test positivity. This is a signal that the virus is still here and that even now everyone needs to be careful to mask and maintain a distance from people outside your households, if not yet vaccinated. The County’s recovery is best supported by continuing to take sensible safety precautions that prevent increases in community transmission.

    • Update on Variants in Los Angeles County (as of June 24): Although transmission rates remain relatively low, Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (LACDPH) continues to track the proliferation of variants of concern, because where there are pockets of unvaccinated individuals, these variants can proliferate. In the United States, the Delta variants have become increasingly prevalent among the strains sequenced: the CDC notes that Delta variants account for almost 21% of cases across the country.  LACDPH is especially concerned about this variant because it appears to be highly transmissible – that is, it is more contagious even than other highly contagious COVID-19 variants.

      In the week ending June 12, Delta variants comprised of nearly 48% of all variants sequenced in Los Angeles County.  The 123 Delta variants collected between April 21 and June 12 are geographically clustered. Forty-nine of these cases were isolated from residents of Palmdale and Lancaster, and 14 of these cases are associated with one household. About half of the people with a Delta variant lived in a household with at least one other Delta variant case.  While fully vaccinated people appear to be well protected from infections with Delta variants, people with only one vaccine are not as well-protected.

    • On June 15, the County modified their travel guidance to align with State and CDC guidance on travel. Please do not travel if you are sick, you have a recent positive COVID-19 test result or you are waiting for results of a COVID-19 test after being exposed to the virus. You could spread COVID-19 to others. 

    • On June 14, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health issued a new Health Officer Order for a Safer Return Together at Work and in the Community effective as of 12:01 a.m. on June 15.

      Brief Highlights:

      • Rescinds most LACDPH sector-specific protocols and aligns with the State Beyond the Blueprint for Industry and Business Sectors and the accompanying memoranda and orders of the State Public Health Officer.
      • Urges everyone, especially those who are not or cannot be vaccinated against COVID-19, to continue to exercise caution and good judgment as physical distancing requirements and capacity limitations are removed.
    • On June 2, the Los Angeles County Health Officer Order was revised to permit the operation of Overnight Organized / Children’s Camps in compliance with the requirements of Appendix K-1. Owners and operators must give prior notice of intended operation to County Environmental Health to allow sufficient time for an inspection of the premises before reopening.
    • Update on Variants in Los Angeles County (as of May 22): Variant cases of COVID-19 continue to be identified in Los Angeles County. The most common circulating variant of concern in the County is now the UK variant (B.1.1.7); in the past, the California (B.1.427/429) variants have been dominant. Of the 40 specimens analyzed by the Public Health Laboratory in the past week, 53% were the UK variant and none were the California variant. The lab also detected six Brazil (P.1) variants last week and one South African variant (B.1.351). 
      The identification of these variants and the news of spreading variants from across the globe highlights the need for residents to continue to take measures to protect themselves and others: this is particularly true for those who are not vaccinated against COVID-19 who can end up unknowingly being incubators of variants of concern. If you are not yet vaccinated or unable to get vaccinated, it is very important that you continue to wear a mask and maintain 6 feet of distance when around others not in your household and consider getting the COVID-19 vaccine as soon as you can. 
    • On May 14, the Los Angeles County Health Officer Order was updated to clarify that professional services businesses, including residential and commercial real estate, should operate in compliance with Appendix A: Social Distancing.
    • Update on Variants in Los Angeles County (as of May 14): The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health continues to track and study variants of COVID-19 in the County. Like all viruses, SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, changes constantly through mutation, and the more transmission there is of the virus, the more mutations there will be. The two most commonly circulating variants of concern in the County have been, and remain, the UK (B.1.1.7) and California (B.1.427/429) variants. Of the 79 specimens analyzed by the Public Health Laboratory in the past week, 35% were the UK variant and 6% were the California variant. The lab also detected 11 Brazil (P.1) variants last week, a significant increase from prior sequencing results. All of the information currently available indicates that vaccines appear to be highly effective in preventing transmission, hospitalizations and deaths, even with the increased presence of variants.
    • On May 5, the Los Angeles County Health Officer Order was updated to reflect newly permitted activities allowed in the yellow tier, beginning Thursday, May 6 at 12:01 a.m. Additional safety modifications are required or recommended for some sectors.
      • The modifications to the Health Officer Order include the following:
        • Amusement/Theme Parks/Fairs can increase capacity to 35%.  Fully vaccinated out of state visitors are permitted.
        • Bars that do not provide meals can operate indoors at 25% capacity or 100 people, whichever is fewer. Masking always required, except when eating or drinking; drinking and eating only while seated. Tables must be at least 6 feet apart and no counter seating/service. Maximum of 6 people from one household per table; if everyone in a group is vaccinated, 6 people can sit together from up to 6 different households. TV viewing is permitted. No live entertainment permitted indoors. Outdoors tables can have a maximum 8 persons per table from up to 3 different households; if everyone in a group is vaccinated, 8 people sit together from up to 8 different households. Live entertainment and TV viewing permitted outdoors. No counter seating/service.
        • Breweries, Wineries, Distilleries that do not serve meals can increase indoors capacity to 50% or 200 people, whichever is fewer. No live entertainment permitted indoors. These establishments will follow the same public health directives as bars for their outdoor areas.
        • Restaurants can increase capacity for indoor dining to 50% capacity with continued safety modifications. There must be 6 feet distancing between tables. Maximum of 6 people from one household per table; if everyone in a group is vaccinated, 6 people can sit together from up to 6 different households.
        • Cardrooms/Racetracks/Satellite Wagering Facilities can operate indoors at 50% capacity. There must be 6-feet of distancing between tables and masks are always required. Food and beverages remain banned at the tables.
        • Fitness Centers can operate indoors at 50% capacity. Masks are always required unless swimming.
        • Movie Theatres can operate at 50% capacity. Reserved seating only where each group is seated with at least 6 feet of distance between any other groups (in all directions); capacity is limited to ensure that there is at least 6 feet of distance between groups. Seating sections can be established for fully vaccinated people without 6 feet distancing requirements provided there is 3 feet of distance between these sections and other seats in the theatre. Eating is allowed in only designated areas or in your reserved seat.
        • Family Entertainment Centers can operate at 50% capacity, 75% if all guests are tested or show proof of full vaccination. Masks are required.
        • Grocery and Retail Stores capacity remains limited to 75% with continued requirement for distancing of at least 6 feet between customers.
        • Hair Salons, Barbershops and Personal Care Services can operate at 75% capacity with masks required, except for services where customers need to remove their masks. For services where customers must remove their face coverings, staff must wear a fitted N95 mask or a face covering with a face shield.
        • Museums, Zoos and Aquariums can be open indoors at 75% capacity with safety modifications.
        • Waterparks can operate at 40% capacity with safety modifications.
        • Youth and Adult Recreational Sports and Community Sporting Events can apply to Public Health for approval for athletic events, tournaments or competitions that involve more than two teams or multiple individuals.  Indoor moderate and high contact sports are permitted following Collegiate Sports Protocols, which includes regular testing.
        • Live Event and Performance Indoor venues up to 1,500 guests can operate at a maximum of 25% capacity or 50% if guests are tested or show proof of full vaccination. Venues with 1,501 guests and above can operate at 10% capacity of 2,000 people; whichever is fewer or 50% capacity for tested or fully vaccinated guests.
        • Live Event and Performance Outdoor venues can expand to 67% capacity with safety modifications.
    • Los Angeles County Meets Yellow Tier Threshold: Los Angeles County has met the threshold for the least restrictive yellow tier in the State's Blueprint for a Safer Economy. On May 4, the State released updated blueprint tier numbers; Los Angeles County's adjusted case rate dropped from 1.9 new cases per 100,000 people to 1.6 new cases per 100,000. The overall test positivity rate dropped from 0.9% to 0.7%, and in areas with the fewest health affirming resources, the County’s test positivity rate dropped from 1.0% to 0.8%.
      A revised Health Officer Order will go into effect on Thursday, May 6, to reflect newly permitted activities. Moving into the yellow tier allows, on Thursday, for increases in capacity in many sectors and allows bars to begin providing indoor service at 25% capacity. All of these changes will still require safety modifications, including masking, distancing and infection control to reduce the risk of transmission. The sectors with increases in capacity limits include amusement parks and fairs, gyms and fitness centers, yoga studios, private events, bars, hotels and short-term lodging rentals, private gatherings, breweries, indoor playgrounds, restaurants, cardrooms and racetracks, indoor and outdoor live events and performances, wineries and tasting rooms, family entertainment centers, and museums, zoos, and aquariums. The modified Health Officer Order will be posted on Wednesday, May 5 with an effective date of Thursday, May 6.
    • On April 29, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health posted the revised Health Officer Order (HOO): Reopening Safer at Work and in the Community For Control of COVID-19, dated April 29, 2021, effective as of 12:01 AM on Friday, April 30, 2021.
      • The following updates were included:
        The Health Officer Order aligns with the change in CDC recommendations around masking for fully vaccinated people. 
        Indoor arcades and indoor playgrounds (bounce centers, ball pits, laser tag) are allowed to open at 25% maximum indoor capacity with safety modifications. 
        Bars, breweries and wineries hours of operation limitations due to the pandemic have been removed.
        Employees who are fully vaccinated at food service facilities have the option of wearing a face shield in addition to a face mask when in close contact with customers; wearing a mask is still required. Employers must verify and document an employee's full vaccination status if a fully vaccinated employee chooses not to wear a face shield.  
        In-person behavioral health (mental health and substance use) therapeutic and educational support groups, such as Alcoholics or Narcotics Anonymous or Patient Education groups, may return to typical participant levels with specified safety modifications.
    • Update on Variants in Los Angeles County (as of April 21): The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health continues to identify variant cases in Los Angeles County. The two most commonly circulating variants of concern in the County have been and remain the UK (B.1.1.7) and California (B.1.427/429) variants. Of the 59 specimens analyzed by the Public Health Laboratory in the past week, 50% were the UK variant and 10% were the California variant. Most of the specimens analyzed were associated with clusters of cases, and where specimens were sequenced from larger outbreaks, the UK variant is currently identified more often than other virus variants. The Public Health Laboratory did not detect any additional Brazil (P.1) variants last week, although it is likely there are undetected cases of this variant circulating in our region.
    • Update on Variants in Los Angeles County (as of April 14): The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health continues to identify variant cases in the County. The two most commonly circulating variants of concern in have been the UK (B.1.1.7) and California (B.1.427/429) variants. Of the 40 specimens analyzed by the Public Health Laboratory in the past week, 55% were the UK variant and 28% were the California variant. The Public Health Laboratory also detected three Brazil (P.1) variants last week. Although these are the first confirmed Brazil variant cases in the County, it is likely there are other undetected cases of this variant circulating in our region.
    • The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health is making several changes to the Health Officer Order that will take effect on Thursday, April 15. These changes align with the State changes to the Blueprint for a Safer Economy regarding indoor live events and performances, private events such as conferences, receptions and meetings, and private informal gatherings. The updated Health Officer Order reflecting these modifications will be posted online on Wednesday, April 14 along with changes to the protocols for each of these sectors.
      • Starting this Thursday, indoor live events and performances will be permitted in Los Angeles County with the following safety measures:
        • Indoor live events and performances are able to open for in-state visitors only, who must pre-purchase tickets.
        • Eating or drinking is not permitted anywhere except pre-designated eating areas.
        • Masks must be worn at all times except when in designated eating areas.
        • There must be 6-feet of distance between different households unless people are fully vaccinated.
        • As with outdoor live events, employers must offer a weekly worker testing program.
      • For venues that hold up to 1,500 people, there is a maximum capacity limit of 15% or 200 people, whichever is fewer. However, the capacity limit can increase to 35% if all guests are tested or vaccinated. For venues holding more than 1,500 people, there is a capacity limit of 10% or 2,000 people, whichever is fewer, although the capacity limit can increase to 25% if all guests are tested or vaccinated.
      • Private meetings such as conferences, receptions and meetings will be permitted starting on Thursday, April 15 with the following safety measures:
        • There must be a defined guest list or tickets must be purchased.
        • Masks must be worn at all times unless attendees are eating or drinking.
        • There must be 6-feet of distance between tables and chairs for guests not vaccinated.
        • There must be assigned seating or a seating chart with a max of 6 people per table for guests not vaccinated.
        • And there can be no intermingling of multiple private events.
      • For outdoor private events, a maximum of 100 people is allowed, but that limit can increase to 300 people if all guests are tested or vaccinated. Tables are also limited to 6 people from a maximum of 3 households unless everyone at the table is vaccinated. Indoor private events are only allowed if all guests are tested or vaccinated with a limit of 150 guests.
      • The County is also modifying the protocols for private social or informal gatherings. Outdoor gatherings can have up to a maximum of 50 people. Masks will be required at all times unless people are eating or drinking. There must be 6-feet of distance between tables and chairs. Seating at tables is restricted to 6 people from up to three households. If everyone is vaccinated, the capacity limit at tables are not necessary. 
      • Indoor private gatherings are permitted, but strongly discouraged. If you choose to hold an indoor private gathering, the following are required safety modifications:
        • A max of 25 people or a 25% capacity limit where capacity limits exist.
        • Masks must be worn at all times, unless everyone is full vaccinated.
        • And there can be no eating or drinking unless everyone attending is fully vaccinated or everyone attending is fully vaccinated except for members of 1 household that does not have any high-risk individuals.
    • Update on Variants in Los Angeles County (as of April 7): The Department of Public Health has identified one case of the South African variant, B.1.351, and three cases of the Brazilian P.1 variant, both variants of concern. The CDC classified the South African and Brazilian variants as variants of concern because they are potentially associated with increased transmissibility and reduced susceptibility to certain therapeutics. Although these are the first reported cases of the South African and Brazilian variant in the County, it is likely there are additional undetected/undiagnosed cases. 
      Among 70 specimens analyzed at the Public Health Laboratory this past week, 64% of the specimens analyzed were the UK variant of concern, B.1.1.7 and 20% were the California variant of concern identified as B.1.427 or 429. This means 84% of the variants identified this past week are variants of concern with the probability of increased transmissibility and more severe disease. Three cases of the New York variant were also detected this week, which is a variant of interest. There were no cases of the Brazilian P.2 variant identified this week.
    • Los Angeles County Travel Advisory and Guidance:
      • On April 5, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health updated their travel advisory:
        • All individuals should continue to avoid non-essential travel
        • Fully vaccinated persons are at lower risk and may travel taking public health precautions
          • If asymptomatic, no quarantine or testing is needed upon return
      • All non-essential travelers who are not fully vaccinated must:
        • Quarantine for 7 full days after travel if they get tested and get a negative COVID-19 viral test result from a specimen collected 3-5 days after their arrival
        • Quarantine for 10 full days after travel if they did not get tested with a COVID-19 viral test after their arrival
      • All travelers must:
        • Self-monitor for symptoms of COVID-19 for 14 days, and avoid being around people who are at increased risk for severe illness
        • Isolate and should get tested if symptoms develop
      • To view the full travel advisory and guidance, visit the County’s website here.
    • On April 2, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health revised the Health Officer Order; it will take effect on April 5. Updates include:
      • Revisions reflecting the County’s move into the Orange Tier of the State’s Blueprint for a Safer Economy
      • New protocols for Outdoor Seated Live Events and Performances, Amusement Parks and Theme Parks, and Bars with a low-risk public health food facility permit
      • Increased capacity limits while maintaining Physical Distancing and masking requirements for the following sectors: Restaurants, Breweries and Wineries, Cardrooms, Places of Worship, Family Entertainment Centers, Shopping Malls, Retail, Fitness Centers, Personal Care Establishments, Limited Services, Movie Theaters, Museums, and Institutes of Higher Education​
    • As of March 30, Los Angeles County has met the threshold for the less restrictive orange tier in the State's Blueprint for a Safer Economy.
      • A revised Los Angeles County Health Officer Order will go into effect on Monday, April 5 at 12:01 a.m. to reflect newly permitted activities. This allows the County to follow the state guidelines and wait until three weeks are completed in the red tier to be sure that case numbers do not rise this third week since the County’s earlier re-openings. The Health Officer Order and modified directives for businesses will be posted on Friday, April 2, with an effective date of April 5.
      • On April 5, assuming County case numbers do not increase, the following changes will be made to the Health Officer Order:
        • Bars that do not provide meals will be allowed to open outdoors with distancing, masking and infection control safety measures. Indoor operations are not permitted. Masks are required except when people are eating or drinking. There can be no counter seating and people can eat or drink only when they are seated. Tables must be 8 feet apart, with a maximum of 6 people from up to 3 different households. There can be no live entertainment, television is permitted, and hours of operations are from 11:30 a.m. until 10:00 p.m.
        • Breweries, Wineries, Distilleries that do not serve meals can remain open outdoors and can also open indoors at 25% capacity or 100 people, whichever is fewer. These establishments will follow the same public health directives as bars for their outdoor areas, however, there are additional requirements for indoor spaces: reservations are required for indoor seating, there is a maximum of 6 people per table and they must be from the same household, and there is no live entertainment or television viewing indoors.
        • Restaurants can increase capacity for indoor dining to 50% capacity or 200 people, whichever is less with continued safety modifications.
        • Cardrooms can operate indoors at 25% capacity. There must be 8-feet of distancing between tables and masks are always required. Food and beverages remain banned from card tables.
        • Places of Worship can hold services indoors at 50% capacity.
        • Fitness Centers can operate indoors at 25% capacity and indoor pools can now re-open. Masks are always required unless swimming.
        • Movie Theatres can increase capacity to 50% or 200 people, whichever is less. Seats must be reserved, and each group must have 6 feet of distance from other groups in all directions. Eating is allowed in only designated areas or in your reserved seat.
        • Family Entertainment Centers can open indoors at 25% capacity for distanced activities, such as bowling or escape rooms. Masks remain required.
        • Grocery and Retail Stores can increase capacity to 75%, although Public Health strongly recommends grocery stores remain at 50% capacity until April 15 to allow as many grocery store workers as possible get vaccinated.
        • Hair Salons, Barbershops and Personal Care Services can increase capacity to 75% with masks required, except for services where customers need to remove their masks. For services where customers must remove their face coverings, staff must wear a fitted N95 or a mask with a face shield.
        • Museums, Zoos and Aquariums can be open indoors at 50% capacity.
        • Youth and Adult Recreational Sports can apply to Public Health for approval for athletic events, tournaments or competitions that involve more than two teams or multiple individuals.
    • On March 19, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health revised the Health Officer Order. The following changes took effect on March 20:
      • Breweries, Wineries and Craft Distilleries that do not provide a meal may open for outdoor service only with certain restrictions, including: 
        • All guests must have reservations;
        • Guests are limited to a 90-minute time limit for their visit;
        • Guests must be seated at tables before they place their order, and are not permitted to stand or congregate with others;
        • And hours are limited with service for on-site consumption closing by 8:00 pm.
      • Breweries, Wineries and Craft Distilleries that serve a bona fide meal can be open for indoor dining operations at 25% of indoor capacity and must follow the same modifications required of restaurants.
      • Clarity for certain types of businesses that serve the public but are not typical retail establishments, such as non-school learning centers, bank and credit union branches, check cashing services, tax preparation, auto repair, auto dealerships and dry cleaners. These types of limited services businesses are now permitted for indoor operations with modifications at 50% capacity.
      • For mental health, support groups and spiritual counseling, the number of in-person participants increases from 10 to 12 participants to make this type of support more accessible to those in the community. Public Health still encourages services to be provided remotely when at all possible.
      • For office-based worksites, businesses that must open indoors for essential operations that cannot be done remotely must also limit indoor capacity to 50% of maximum occupancy.
      • For youth and adult recreational sports, the County is aligning with State to allow for indoor sports to engage in indoor activities, including training, conditioning, contact practice and competition if they adhere to State requirements. 
        • Limiting any indoor sports activities to 10% of indoor occupancy; observers are not permitted for any youth or adult indoor sports activities, including competitions;
        • Regular testing of players, coaches and staff;
        • Development and implementation of a Return to Play Safety Plan and a Site-Specific Safety Plan. Plans must be filed with Public Health 14-days prior to indoor activity.
    • On March 12, the State announced 2 million COVID-19 vaccine doses have been administered to people in the most under-resourced communities across the state which now allows Los Angeles County to move to the less restrictive red tier.

      The Health Officer Order has been updated and aligns closely with the State’s re-opening framework allowed in the red tier. Additional safety modifications are required or recommended for certain sectors. 

      Effective Monday, March 15 at 12:01 a.m., the following are permitted:​

      • Museum, Zoos and Aquariums can open indoors at 25% capacity.
      • Gyms, Fitness Centers, Yoga and Dance Studios can open indoors at 10% capacity with masking requirement for all indoor activities.
      • Movie Theatres can open indoors at 25% capacity with reserved seating only where each group is seated with at least 6 feet of distance in all directions between any other groups.
      • Retail and Personal Care Services can increase capacity to 50% with masking required at all times and for all services.
      • Restaurants can open indoors at 25% max capacity under the following conditions: eight feet distancing between tables; one household per indoor table with a limit of six people; the HVAC system is in good working order and has been evaluated, and to the maximum extent possible ventilation has been increased. Public Health strongly recommends that all restaurant employees interacting with customers indoors are provided with additional masking protection (above the currently required face shield over face masks); this can be fit tested N95 masks, KN95 masks, or double masks, in addition to the required face shield. Public Health also strongly recommends that all employees working indoors are informed about and offered opportunities to be vaccinated against COVID-19. Outdoor dining can accommodate up to six people per table from three different households.
      • Indoor Shopping Malls can increase capacity to 50% with common areas remaining closed; food courts can open at 25% capacity adhering to the restaurant guidance for indoor dining.
      • Institutes of Higher Education can re-open all permitted activities with required safety modifications except for residential housing which remains under current restrictions for the Spring semester.
      • Schools are permitted to re-open for in-person instruction for students in grades 7-12 adhering to all state and county directives.
      • Private gatherings can occur indoors with up to three separate households, with masking and distancing required at all times.  People who are fully vaccinated can gather in small numbers indoors with other people who are fully vaccinated without required masking and distancing. 
    • On March 10, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health updated the Health Officer Order to include the CDC Interim Public Health Guidance for fully vaccinated people and visits or small private gatherings.
    • On February 20, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health confirmed 14 total cases of the COVID-19 variant B.1.1.7 (U.K. variant) in Los Angeles County. This variant is known to spread more easily and quickly than other variants and is circulating in the state and county. In January 2021, scientists from U.K. reported evidence that suggests the B.1.1.7 variant may be associated with an increased risk of death compared with other variants. More studies are needed to confirm this finding.
    • On February 18, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health updated the Health Officer Order to note that per the State Consolidated Framework and Guidance, when the County adjusted daily case rate has been less than 25 per 100,000 population for five consecutive days and the school has met all the state and county requirements for reopening, schools may open for in-person instruction for students in grades TK-6. Schools in California may not reopen for in-person instruction for grades 7-12 if the county is in Tier 1 (Purple, Widespread).
    • On February 10, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health updated the Health Officer Order. In light of the recent U.S. Supreme Court decision and the subsequent change made by the State related to Places of Worship in Tier 1, Places of Worship can open for indoor services limited to 25% of indoor capacity and must continue to comply with the required modifications provided by Appendix A.
    • On February 3, Los Angeles County updated the Travel Advisory and Guidance. Postponing travel and staying home is the best way to protect yourself and others from COVID-19 during this pandemic. Please do NOT travel if you are sick. To read the full Travel Advisory and Guidance, click here. 
      • Non-Essential Travel
        1. Los Angeles County residents should continue to avoid all non-essential travel and stay within 120 miles from their place of residence, unless they are traveling for essential purposes. "Non-essential travel" includes travel that is considered tourism or recreational in nature. 
        2. All non-essential travelers from other states or countries are strongly discouraged from entering the County of Los Angeles and need to self-quarantine. 
        3. All persons arriving in or returning to the County of Los Angeles from other states or countries, must self-quarantine for 10 days after arrival, except as necessary to meet urgent critical healthcare staffing needs or to otherwise engage in emergency response. Additionally, this does not apply to individuals who routinely cross state or country borders solely for the purpose of essential travel.
      • Quarantine Requirements

        If you do travel into Los Angeles County from outside of California, you need to self-quarantine for 10 days after you arrive and must limit your interactions to people in your household/people with whom you live. If you travel into Los Angeles County solely for essential work purposes, you need to still self-quarantine outside of your work for 10 days and ensure you do not mix with others outside of those necessary to conduct your essential work.

      • People at high-risk of severe COVID-19 should be particularly careful about traveling, including:
        People who are older, smoke or are overweight
        Pregnant women
        People with certain medical conditions like diabetes, heart problems, COPD, cancer, weakened immune systems, and sickle cell disease.
    • On January 29, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health issued a revised Health Officer Order to allow reopening of some additional businesses with updated protocols and to remove the closure of Lower-Risk Retail Businesses between 10 p.m. – 5 a.m. Read the Health Officer Order here.

      Outdoor dining allowable with physical distancing and new infection control protocols in place

      • Employees that may come in contact with customers must wear both a face mask and a face shield at all times when interacting with customers and when in customer service areas.
      • Outdoor dining table seating must be limited to no more than 6 people per table, all of whom must be from the same household.
      • Outdoor tables must be repositioned or removed so that all tables are at least 8 feet apart.
      • Televisions or other screens that broadcast programming must remain off.
    • On January 25, the California Department of Public Health ended the Regional Stay Home Order across California. This action comes as the four-week ICU capacity projections are above 15%. Counties will return to their assigned Blueprint for a Safer Economy tiers. LA County is in the purple or widespread tier, the most restrictive tier. With the cancellation of the Regional Stay Home Order, the LA County Health Officer Order issued on Nov. 25 is now in effect until a new Health Officer Order is issued on Friday, allowing restaurants to reopen for outdoor dining with occupancy limits and masking requirements.
       
      Allowable starting, January 25, 2021
      • Private Gatherings: Limited to 3 households & total of 15 people outdoors only
      • Family Entertainment Centers: Open for outdoor operations (50%)
      • Museums, zoos and aquariums: Open for outdoor operations
      • Cardrooms: Open for outdoor operations (50%)
      • Miniature golf, go karts, batting cages: Open for outdoor operations (50%)
      • Outdoor recreational activity: Open
      • Hotel, motels: Tourism and individual travel allowed
      • Fitness facilities: Open for outdoor operations
      • Personal care: Open at 25% indoor capacity
      • Indoor malls, shopping centers, lower-risk retail: Open at 25% indoor capacity, food courts and common areas closed
      Allowable Starting January 29, 2021
      • Restaurants: Outdoor Only
    • On January 22, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health reported they are monitoring another variant known as the Denmark variant, or what experts have labeled as L452R. What is not known at this point is whether it is more transmissible, but there is concern about its mutations. This variant is in California and is beginning to show up in a lot more samples, according to one independent analysis.
    • On January 16, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health reported that it confirmed the first case of COVID-19 variant B.1.1.7, the same variant discovered in the United Kingdom (U.K.), in an individual who recently spent time in Los Angeles County.
      Although this is the first confirmed case of the U.K. variant in Los Angeles County, the Department of Public Health believes that it is already spreading in the community. Viruses constantly change through mutation, and new variants of a virus are expected to occur over time. Sometimes new variants emerge and disappear. Other times, new variants emerge and persist. Multiple variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 have been documented in the United States and globally during this pandemic.
      The variant B.1.1.7 spreads more easily and quickly than other variants. Currently, there is no evidence that it causes more severe illness or increased risk of death. This variant was first detected in September 2020 and is now highly prevalent in London and Southeast England. It has since been detected in numerous countries around the world, including the United States and Canada. The Centers for Disease Control conducts routine analysis of SARS-CoV-2 genetic sequence data to support public health response. The Department of Public Health lab is also regularly analyzing specimens for variants, including the U.K. variant, and, to date, has not identified other cases linked to this specific variant.
    • On December 30, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health revised the Temporary Targeted Safer at Home Health Officer Order to include a Mandatory Directive on Travel (Appendix W). Persons arriving in Los Angeles County from anywhere outside of the Southern California Region on or from non-essential travel, including returning Los Angeles County residents, must self-quarantine for 10 days after arrival. Quarantine may end after Day 10 if travelers never had any symptoms and they continue to monitor themselves for COVID-19 symptoms for 14 days after arrival. If they develop symptoms or test positive for COVID-19 during the quarantine period, they must isolate as required. The Southern California Region is defined as the counties of Imperial, Inyo, Los Angeles, Mono, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara and Ventura.  
    • On December 27, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health revised the Temporary Targeted Safer at Home Health Officer Order. It will remain in effect for as long as the State Public Health Officer’s Regional Stay at Home remains in effect in the Southern California Region.
    • On December 19, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health revised the Temporary Targeted Safer at Home Health Officer Order to align with recent Supreme Court rulings for places of worship. Places of worship are permitted to offer faith-based services both indoors and outdoors with mandatory physical distancing and face masks over both the nose and mouth that must be worn at all times while on site. Places of worship must also assure that attendance does not exceed the number of people who can be accommodated while maintaining a physical distance of six feet between separate households. It is strongly recommended that places of worship continue to hold services outdoors, with physical distancing and the use of face masks to prevent the spread of COVID-19 to congregants and to the entire community.
    • On December 9, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health revised the Temporary Targeted Safer at Home Health Officer Order to fully align with the State Regional Stay at Home Order. The Order prohibits private gatherings of any size, closes sector operations and requires 100% masking and physical distancing.  
      • Under the order, the following sectors are allowed to remain open with safety precautions: 
        • Critical infrastructure (when remote option is not possible)
        • Schools
        • Non-urgent medical and dental care
        • Child care and pre-K
      • The following sectors will have additional modifications in addition to 100% masking and physical distancing:
        • Outdoor recreational facilities: Allow outdoor operation only for the purpose of facilitating physically distanced personal health and wellness through outdoor exercise, without any food, drink or alcohol sales. Additionally, overnight stays at campgrounds will not be permitted.
        • Retail: Allow indoor operation at 20% capacity, and 35% of capacity for standalone grocery stores, with entrance metering and no eating or drinking in the stores. Additionally, special hours should be instituted for seniors and others with chronic conditions or compromised immune systems. 
        • Shopping centers: Allow indoor access at 20% capacity with entrance metering and no eating or drinking in the stores. Additionally, special hours should be instituted for seniors and others with chronic conditions or compromised immune systems.
        • Hotels and lodging: Allow for COVID-19 mitigation and containment measures, treatment measures, provide accommodation for essential workers, or providing housing solutions, including measures to protect homeless populations.
        • Restaurants: Allow only for take out or delivery.
        • Offices: Allow remote only except for critical infrastructure sectors where remote working is not possible. 
        • Places of worship and political expression: Allow outdoor activities only.
        • Entertainment production: Industries, studios, and other related establishments such as establishments that provide content for professional broadcast can operate without live audiences.
      • The following sectors must be closed (except to the extent that their operations fall within critical infrastructure):
        • Hair salons and barbershops
        • Personal care services
        • Museums, zoos and aquariums
        • Movie theaters (except drive-in)
        • Wineries, bars, breweries and distilleries
        • Family entertainment centers
        • Cardrooms and satellite wagering
        • Limited services
        • Live audience sports
        • Amusement parks
    • On December 6, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health revised the Temporary Targeted Safer at Home Health Officer Order to fully align with the State Regional Stay at Home Order. The Order prohibits private gatherings of any size, closes sector operations and requires 100% masking and physical distancing.
      • The following sectors are required to close or remain closed for all operations: 
        • Amusement parks
        • Live audience sports
        • Cardrooms and satellite wagering
        • Family entertainment centers
        • Bars, breweries and distilleries
        • Wineries
        • Movie theaters
        • Museums, zoos and aquariums
        • Personal care services
        • Hair salons and barbershops
        • Indoor recreational facilities
        • Indoor and outdoor playgrounds
      • The following sectors will have additional modifications in addition to 100% masking and physical distancing:
        • Outdoor recreational facilities: Allow outdoor operation only without any food, drink or alcohol sales. Additionally, overnight stays for recreational visits at campgrounds will not be permitted.
        • Retail: Allow indoor operation at 20% capacity with entrance metering and no eating or drinking in the stores. Additionally, special hours should be instituted for seniors and others with chronic conditions or compromised immune systems. 
        • Shopping centers: Allow indoor operation at 20% capacity with entrance metering and no eating or drinking in the stores and all common areas closed. Additionally, special hours should be instituted for seniors and others with chronic conditions or compromised immune systems.
        • Hotels and lodging: Allow to open for critical infrastructure support only.
        • Restaurants: Allow only for take-out, pick-up or delivery.
        • Offices: Allow remote only except for critical infrastructure sectors where remote working is not possible. 
        • Places of worship and political expression: Allow outdoor services only.
        • Entertainment production including professional sports: Allow operation without live audiences. Additionally, testing protocol and “bubbles” are highly encouraged.
      • The Order does not modify existing school guidance. Schools that are open under County protocols can continue to provide in-person instruction as permitted.
      • The following sectors are allowed to remain open with appropriate infectious disease preventative measures including 100% masking and physical distancing:
        • Critical infrastructure
        • Non-urgent medical and dental care
        • Childcare
    • On Saturday, November 28, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health issued a Temporary, Targeted Safer at Home Health Officer Order for Control of COVID-19, effective from 12:01 a.m. (Pacific Standard Time) November 30, 2020 to 11:59 p.m. (PST) December 20, 2020. 

      This Temporary Targeted Safer at Home Order for Control of COVID-19: Tier 1 Substantial Surge Response is issued to temporarily replace the most recently issued Reopening Safer at Work and in the Community for Control of COVID-19 Order issued by the County of Los Angeles Health Officer. Click here for a summary document of the changes. 

      This Temporary Order is issued as a response to the recent substantial rise in COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations and deaths. Over the last five calendar days, the County of Los Angeles is averaging more than 4,500 newly diagnosed COVID-19 cases per day. Between November 13-27, 2020, hospitalizations of confirmed COVID-19 patients have increased by 101% to 1,893. The Health Officer expects both the number of new cases and hospitalizations to continue to rapidly increase over the next 21 days. Without rapid public health interventions, continued and substantial increases in both cases and hospitalizations will stress the health care system. This stress will limit the availability of Intensive Care Unit beds for non-COVID-19 hospitalizations.

      This Temporary Order’s intent is to continue to ensure that County residents remain in their residences as much as practicable, to limit close contact with others outside their household in both indoor and outdoor spaces and to further reduce the increased risk of community transmission of COVID-19 resulting from the unprecedented surge of new daily cases.

      All public and private gatherings and events with people from more than one household are not permitted except for outdoor faith-based services and outdoor protests.

      People leaving their residences must strictly comply with the Social (Physical) Distancing, as specified in guidance or protocols established by the County Department of Public Health. This Temporary Order requires all persons wear a face mask over both the nose and mouth whenever they leave their place of residence and are or can be in contact with non-household members in public or private places, both indoors and outdoors.

      The Temporary Targeted Safer at Home Health Officer Order is available by clicking here.

    • On Wednesday, November 25, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health updated its Reopening Safer at Work and in the Community Health Officer Order to better align with the State Public Health Officer's Order of November 19. The new Health Officer Order:
      • Align(s) this Order with the State Public Health Officer's November 19, 2020 "Limited Stay at Home Order," effective in counties under Tier One (Purple) of California's Blueprint for a Safer Economy, requiring that all gatherings with members of other households and all activities conducted outside the residence, lodging or temporary accommodation with members of other households cease between 10:00 p.m. PST and 5:00 a.m. PST, except for those activities permitted in this order or required by law, which took effect on November 21, 2020 at 10:00 p.m. PST. This State "Limited Stay at Home Order" remains in effect until 5:00 a.m. PST on December 21, 2020 and may be extended or revised as needed.
      • Require(s) restaurants, breweries and wineries to only offer food and beverage via take-out, drive thru or delivery. Wineries and breweries may continue their retail operations. These limitations are effective November 25 through December 17, 2020.
      • You can read the Health Officer Order here.
    • On Thursday, November 19, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health issued a revised "Reopening Safer at Work and in the Community for Control of COVID-19" Health Officer Order. Effective as of November 20, the Health Officer Order has been updated to do the following:
      • Limit number of persons at private outdoor gatherings to 15 persons, all from a maximum of three different "households," which includes the host "household." Clarify steps someone should take to notify attendees and contact Public Health if they develop COVID-19 within 48 hours after attending a private gathering.
      • Limit number of customers at outdoor restaurants, breweries and wineries to 50% of the establishment's outdoor capacity. Restaurants, breweries and wineries may not be open for in-person outdoor dining and wine services, between the hours of 10:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m., but may continue to serve food for delivery, drive-thru and carry out during the time closed for in-person dining.
      • Limit number of customers at outdoor cardrooms, miniature golf, batting cages and go-kart racing to 50% of the establishment's outdoor capacity.
      • Limit the number of persons at indoor operations for retail, office and personal care to 25% capacity. Require face masks to be worn by customers at all times while at Personal Care Establishments.
      • Clarify that an essential business must comply with the Social (Physical) Distancing Protocol and all other applicable protocols for its business sector.
      • Specify the type of retail food markets that must comply with the new Protocols for Grocery Stores and Retail Food Markets.
      • You can read the revised Health Officer Order here.
    • On Tuesday, Nov. 17, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health announced that effective Friday, November 20, Los Angeles County will tighten pandemic safeguards and restrictions as COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations continue to increase significantly. These safeguards and restrictions protect the public health and safety of our residents, and their ability to be served in our hospitals. COVID-19 cases have more than doubled since the beginning of November and hospitalizations have increased from an average of about 900 a day to well over 1,000 a day in same time period.
    • On October 23, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health revised the Health Officer Order to allow the following activities:
      • Permit batting cages, miniature golf and go-cart racing to operate outside only. Arcades and other indoor family entertainment operations remain closed.
      • Permit personal care establishments to offer services indoors with modifications.
      • Clarify permitted food services at indoor malls and shopping centers.
      • Increase the percentage of students with IEPs and Els, and other high-need students allowed at any one time on a K-12 campus from 10% to 25%.
      • Permit schools to reopen TK-2nd grades for classroom instruction only with a waiver application approved by the Department of Public Health.
      • Wineries that do not serve food may serve wine to customers outdoors with modifications. Bars and craft distilleries remain closed. Read more.
      • Read the Health Officer Order here.
    • On October 14, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health revised the Health Officer Order to more closely align with California Department of Public Health Guidance for the Prevention of COVID-19 Transmission for Gatherings. The Health Officer Order allows private gatherings of three or fewer households, as long as the private gathering is outdoors, everyone wears a face mask and keeps at least six feet of physical distance, food is in single-serve disposable containers and the duration of the gathering is two hours or less. Private gatherings with people from different households increases the risk of COVID-19 transmission, with the risk increasing the longer the gathering. The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health recommends if you do gather with two other households, that you do so with the same households each time, to create a quasi-bubble that can reduce the risk of spreading the virus. Large public events and gatherings remain prohibited, even if held outdoors. Read the Health Officer Order here.
    • On October 6, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health revised the Health Officer Order to allow outdoor dining at non-restaurant breweries and wineries. Read the Health Officer Order here and view reopening chart.
    • On October 5, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health revised the Health Officer Order to allow the following sectors to reopen on the following dates under the following restrictions. Read the Health Officer Order here and view reopening chart. Public Health is consulting with County Counsel to determine the process and date for re-opening outdoor operations at breweries and wineries serving a meal.
    • On September 29, after a motion was approved by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health will plan to open the school waiver program for in-person instruction for grades TK-2. The program will begin accepting applications in early October for 30 schools per week and prioritize the issuance of waivers to schools with higher percentages of students qualified for free/reduced meals. Superintendents must submit school district waiver requests to re-open for approval by the local Health Officer.
    • On September 2, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health revised the Health Officer Order to allow for limited, on-campus operation for schools as well as limited in-door operations of hair salons and barbershops. Read the Health Officer Order here.
      • Schools: Beginning Monday, September 14, schools K-12 may offer in-school services for small cohorts of (up to 12) students as long as the school is able to fully implement the Health Officer’s reopening protocols. These students include:
        • Students with Individualized Education Plans (IEP)
        • Students requiring instruction for English as a Second Language (ESL) 
        • Students needing assessments or specialized in-school services
        • The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health will not be opening the waiver program for instruction of students in grades TK-6.
      • Hair Salons and Barbershops: Hair salons and barbershops can re-open for indoor services at 25% occupancy provided they are in full compliance with the Health Officer’s protocols. If your hair salon or barbershop has been operating outdoors, please continue to do so and use your 25% occupancy for those services you are not able to provide outdoors. 
    • On August 28, the State revised their recovery roadmap and created an updated, color-coded Tier Framework that classifies each county based on their daily case rate and positivity rate. This tiered system will guide possible sector reopenings for each county to consider. View the new Blueprint for a Safer Economy. Although the State lists permitted activities in each Tier, it is important to note that the County may be more restrictive than State guidance. The ultimate decisions about sector reopenings will remain under the purview of the local Health Officer Orders that are developed in consultation with the Board of Supervisors. 
    • Los Angeles County is currently in Tier 1 (Purple) - meaning that there continues to be widespread transmission of the virus in the county. The current number of new cases per day per 100,000 people is 13.1, nearly double the threshold for this tier which is less than 7 new cases per day per 100,000 population. And even though the County’s current test positivity rate of 5% puts us in Tier 2 (Red) for this metric, when the two metrics fall in different tiers the state places counties in the most restrictive tier. Therefore, the County, like most counties in California, has been placed in Tier 1.
    • On August 12, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health issued a revised Health Officer Order to clarify when elementary schools may seek a waiver for in-person instruction for grades TK-6, update operations for childcare facilities to specify childcare be carried out in groups of 12 or fewer children, and align with new guidance for Institutes of Higher Education. Read the Health Officer Order here.
    • On July 18, to slow the spread of the COVID-19 and protect students, teachers and the school community, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health issued a new Health Officer Order that adheres to California Department of Public Health’s directive that schools in Los Angeles County and 31 other counties on the State’s monitoring list, cannot resume in-person learning next month. Read the Health Officer Order here. 
    • The state order allows superintendents to submit school district waiver requests to re-open elementary schools for approval by the local health officer only after review of local epidemiological data and intervention strategies, and in consultation with CDPH. In order for schools to re-open their campuses, Los Angeles County will have to remain off the monitoring list for 14 consecutive days. Counties are on the monitoring list because they have not achieved more than 150 tests per day per 100,000 people, or have more than 100 cases per 100,000 residents, or have case positivity rates greater than 8%, or have a 10% or more increase in hospitalizations over the past 3 days compared to the prior three days, or less than 20% of ICU beds are open, or less than 25% of ventilators are available.
    • On July 14, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health modified the Health Officer Order to align with Governor Gavin Newsom’s directives to prevent more cases, more serious illnesses, increased hospitalizations and more deaths. Read the Health Officer Order here. The Health Officer Order requires the closure of additional indoor operations for certain sectors which promote the mixing of populations beyond households and make adherence to physical distancing with face masks difficult:
      • Gyms and Fitness Centers
      • Places of Worship
      • Indoor Protests
      • Offices for Non-Critical Infrastructure Sectors as identified at covid19.ca.gov
      • Personal Care Services (including nail salons, massage parlors and tattoo parlors)
      • Hair Salons and Barbershops
      • Indoor Malls
    • On July 8, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health issued a new Health Officer Order: Access to Diagnostic Testing through Healthcare Facilities. Healthcare facilities must provide diagnostic testing to symptomatic persons regardless of age, hospitalization status, co-morbidities or other risk factors for COVID-19 and persons with or without symptoms who were a close contact of a confirmed or probable case of COVID-19. The Health Officer Order is effective July 31. Read the Health Officer Order here.
    • On July 1, a revised Health Officer Order aligned with Governor Newsom’s directives and required the closure of the following for at least 21 days: indoor, in-person dining at restaurants, indoor museums, indoor children’s museums, and indoor operations at zoos and aquariums, and cardrooms and satellite wagering facilities. The Health Officer Order also requires businesses with three or more known cases of COVID-19 within the workplace over the span of 14 days, to report the outbreak to the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health. Employers who have one known case within the workplace must have a protocol that requires that person to self-isolate at home and anyone exposed to self-quarantine. Read the Health Officer Order here.
    • On June 29, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health released a Health Officer Order for the temporary closure of public beaches and prohibition of fireworks shows to prevent dangerous crowding over the Fourth of July weekend. Read the Health Officer Order here. All public beaches, piers, public beach parking lots, beach bike paths that traverse that sanded portion of the beach and beach access points will be temporarily closed to the public as of 12:01 a.m. on July 3 until 5 a.m. on July 6. Please note, surfing is not permitted.
    • •On June 28, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health amended the Safer at Work and in the Community Health Officer Order in response to Governor Newsom's directive to require all bars, breweries, brew pubs, pubs, wineries and tasting rooms in the county to close unless they are offering sit-down dine-in meals. This includes closing bar areas in restaurants. Read the Health Officer Order here.​
    • On June 18, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health issued an updated Safer at Work and in the Community Health Officer Order to allow the following sectors to reopen as early as June 19: Cardrooms, satellite wagering facilities and racetracks with no spectators, personal care services including: esthetician, skin care and cosmetology services; electrology; nail salons; body art professionals, tattoo parlors, microblading and permanent make-up; and piercing shops; and massage therapy, and bars, wineries, breweries and tasting rooms. Read the Health Officer Order here.​
    • On June 11, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health issued an updated Safer at Work and in the Community Health Officer Order to allow music, film and television production, day camps, fitness facilities, museums, zoos, aquariums, professional sports without audiences, campgrounds, RV parks, outdoor recreation, and hotels for leisure travel to reopen. Read the Health Officer Order here.​
    • On May 29, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health issued an updated Safer at Work and in the Community Health Officer Order to allow hair salons, barbershops and restaurants for in-person dining to reopen. Read the Health Officer Order here.​
    • On May 26, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health issued a Safer at Work and in the Community Health Officer Order which allows the following activities to resume or reopen: faith-based services with capacity limited to less than 25% or maximum of 100 people (whichever is lower), office worksites, all indoor and outdoor retail at 50% capacity, flea markets, swap meets and drive-in movie theaters, pools, hot tubs and saunas that are in a multi-unit resident or part of a homeowners association, and public protests with attendance limited to 25% occupancy or a maximum of 100 attendees (whichever is lower). Read the Health Officer Order here.​
    • On May 22, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health issued an addendum to the Safer at Home Order to allow for the reopening of beach bike paths and parking lots, indoor mall curbside service and select vehicle parades. Read the Health Officer Order here.​
    • On May 13, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health issued an addendum to the Safer at Home Order to allow all retailers that are not located in an indoor mall or shopping center to reopen for pickup and delivery only. Manufacturing, warehouses and logistic businesses that supply retail can reopen. Beaches can reopen for active recreation in addition to select recreational facilities. Local jurisdictions may also close streets to allow for greater physical distancing. Read the Health Officer Order here.​
    • On May 8, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health issued an addendum to the Safer at Home Order to allow the following non-essential business to reopen for curbside pick-up with adherence to distancing and infection control protocols: bookstores, clothing stores, florists, music stores, sporting goods stores, toy stores and car dealership showrooms (open for sales with adherence to distancing and infection control protocols). The following outdoor parks and recreational facilities can reopen provided all activities adhere to distancing and infection control protocols: golf courses (not including pro-shops or dine-in restaurants), trails, trailheads and parks. Read the Health Officer Order here.​
    • On April 24, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health issued a new Health Officer Order to prevent COVID-19 transmission in licensed congregate health care facilities. Read the Health Officer Order here.
    • On April 10, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health extended the Safer at Home Order through May 15. The Health Officer Order continues to prohibit all indoor and outdoor public and private gatherings and events, and continues the closure of all indoor malls and shopping centers, all swap meets and flea markets, all indoor and outdoor playgrounds, beaches, trails and trailheads, and in-person operations of all non-essential businesses. Read the Health Officer Order here.
      • Also on April 10, it includes the following:
        • Essential businesses are required to provide face masks to all employees, to wear while performing duties which involve contact w/other employees and/or the public; 
        • Essential businesses are required to post their physical distancing plans; and
        • The public is required to wear a face mask to enter essential businesses
    • On March 27, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health issued an addendum to the Safer at Home Order to include the temporary closure of public trails and trailheads, beaches, piers, beach bike paths and beach access points. Read the Health Officer Order here.
    • On March 25, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health issued two new Health Officer Orders: Home Isolation and Home Quarantine. The Isolation Order states that all individuals who have been diagnosed with or who are likely to have COVID-19 must isolate themselves in their home for a period of 7 days, and 3 days of being symptom-free. The Quarantine Order states that all household contacts, intimate partners, caregivers and close contacts who have been in close contact with a person diagnosed with or likely to have COVID-19 while that person was symptomatic must quarantine themselves for 14 days.
    • On March 21, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health issued an enhanced Health Officer Order to reconcile elements in the March 19 Health Officer Order necessary to be consistent with the Governor’s Order. The enhanced Order prohibits all gatherings and events, and clarifies that golf courses and personal grooming services (including hair and nail salons) are non-essential services that are closed. Read the Health Officer Order here.
    • On March 19, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health issued a Safer at Home order to help slow the spread of COVID-19. The Order further restricts and limits gatherings and requires the closure of malls, shopping centers, children's playgrounds and nonessential retail businesses. Essential businesses like grocery stores, gas stations, hospitals and pharmacies are open. Read the Health Officer Order here.
    • On March 16, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health issued a Health Officer Order to prohibit group events and gatherings, require social distancing measures and the closure of certain businesses, including bars, gyms, movie theaters and entertainment centers. Read the Health Officer Order here.
    • On March 9, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health reported it was investigating two additional cases of COVID-19. One case traveled through Japan. One case has an unidentified source of exposure, therefore LACDPH has determined this is the first possible case of community transmission in LA County.
    • On March 4, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors and the Department of Public Health declared a local and public health emergency in response to increased spread of coronavirus across the country and six additional cases in LA County. LACDPH stated that none of the new cases are from community spread, and all of these new cases were exposed to COVID-19 through close contacts. None of these cases were linked to the first case reported in LA County in January.
    • LA County officials recommend reviewing emergency supplies such as extra food, water and medications. For more emergency preparedness tips, visit ready.gov or bchd.org/emergency-preparedness.
    California
    • Updated COVID-19 Vaccine Eligibility Guidelines
      Updated March 25, 2021 to reflect:
      • Beginning April 1, 2021, individuals age 50-64 years old will be eligible for COVID-19 vaccines.
      • Beginning April 15, 2021, every Californian age 16 and older will become eligible for COVID-19 vaccines.
      • COVID-19 vaccine clinic volunteers are eligible for vaccination if they complete at least one clinic shift and are approved by the clinic’s organizer.
      • Based on available supply, individuals described below are or will be eligible for COVID-19 vaccines:
        • Phase 1A* (healthcare workers and LTC residents): 3,142,166 Californians
        • Phase 1B
          • Food/Agriculture***, Education/Childcare**, and Emergency Services***:  5,960,528 Californians
          • 65+: 6,254,300 Californians
        • Individuals age 16-64 who are deemed to be at the very highest risk for morbidity and mortality from COVID-19 as a direct result of one or more of the severe health conditions included in this provider bulletin.
        • Beginning April 1, 2021, individuals age 50-64 years old will be eligible for COVID-19 vaccines.
        • Beginning April 15, 2021, every Californian age 16 and older will become eligible for COVID-19 vaccines.
        • COVID-19 vaccine clinic volunteers are eligible for vaccination if they complete at least one clinic shift and are approved by the clinic’s organizer.
          Learn More
    • Blueprint Tier Framework Thresholds Upon Meeting Statewide Vaccine Equity Metric Goals


      Click here to view image larger.

      On March 5, the State announced updates to their Blueprint for a Safer Economy. In addition to assessing County case rates, positivity rates and positivity rates in neighborhoods with the lowest scores in the Healthy Places Index, the State is now taking into consideration the number of vaccinations that have been administered in the lowest resourced neighborhoods statewide. Unlike the other 3 metrics, vaccination numbers will be calculated statewide and used to change the case rate thresholds for counties to move from one tier to another.

      Goal #1: Once 2 million vaccine doses have been administered in the state to the communities with the lowest score in the Healthy Places Index, the threshold to move from the purple tier to the red tier will go from 7 new cases per 100,000 people to 10 new cases per 100,000 people. To move to the orange tier, the threshold will remain at 4 cases per 100,000 people, and to move to the yellow tier, the threshold will remain at 1.

      Goal #2: Once 4 million vaccine doses have been administered in the state to the communities with the lowest score in the Healthy Places Index, the threshold to move from the purple tier to the red tier will remain at 10 per 100,000 people, but the threshold will change for moving to the orange tier, from 4 new cases per 100,0000 residents to 6 cases per 100,000 people, and to move to the yellow tier, the threshold will change from 1 new case per 100,000 residents to 2 cases per 100,000 people.

    • On January 25, the California Department of Public Health ended the Regional Stay Home Order across California. This action comes as the four-week ICU capacity projections are above 15%. Counties will return to their assigned Blueprint for a Safer Economy tiers. LA County is in the purple or widespread tier, the most restrictive tier.
    • On January 6, 2021, California updated the Travel Advisory:

      Except in connection with essential travel, Californians should avoid non-essential travel to any part of California more than 120 miles from one's place of residence, or to other states or countries. Avoiding travel reduces the risk of virus transmission, including by reducing the risk that new sources of infection and, potentially, new virus strains will be introduced to California.

      All persons arriving in or returning to California from other states or countries, should self-quarantine for 10 days after arrival, except as necessary to meet urgent critical healthcare staffing needs or to otherwise engage in emergency response. Additionally, this recommendation does not apply to individuals who routinely cross state or country borders for essential travel.

    • On December 5, the California Department of Public Health announced data on intensive care unit (ICU) capacity across the state. Two regions, San Joaquin Valley and Southern California, have dropped below 15% capacity. ICU capacity in the 11 counties of the Southern California Region dropped to 12.5%. The Regional Stay at Home Order will take effect in those two regions at 11:59 p.m. Sunday, December 6, and will remain in effect for at least three weeks. Regions will be eligible to exit from the order and return to the Blueprint for a Safer Economy on December 28 if ICU capacity projections for the following month are above or equal to 15%.
      Under the terms of the order, when ICU capacity drops below 15% in a region, a list of sectors must close by 11:59 p.m. the next day, including bars, breweries, distilleries, and wineries (except for production, manufacturing, and retail), hair salons and barbershops, and personal care services. In addition, a number of sectors in these regions, including restaurants, retail and shopping centers and hotels and lodging, will have additional modifications in addition to 100% masking and physical distancing. Critical infrastructure, schools and non-urgent medical and dental care can remain open with appropriate infectious disease preventative measures.
    • California’s Regional Stay at Home Order: On December 3, California health officials announced the Regional Stay at Home Order that will be triggered if Intensive Care Unit (ICU) capacity drops below 15% in a given region. The order would prohibit private gatherings of any size, close sector operations except for critical infrastructure and retail and require 100% masking and physical distancing in all others. 
      The order takes effect at 12:59 p.m. on December 5. Thereafter, if a region falls below the 15% ICU threshold, it will have 24 hours to implement the Stay at Home Order. The order would remain in effect for at least 3 weeks and, after that period, will be lifted when a region’s projected ICU capacity meets or exceeds 15%. 
      State health officials are tracking the state by five regions: Northern California, Bay Area, Greater Sacramento, San Joaquin Valley and Southern California. No regions currently meet this threshold, but some are projected to within the next week. The Southern California region includes the following counties: Imperial, Inyo, Los Angeles, Mono, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Ventura. Actual ICU capacity remaining as of December 3, 2020 for the Southern California region is 20.6%. 
      Read more here. 
    • On November 19, the State issued a Limited Stay at Home order, effective in counties under Tier One (Purple) of California's Blueprint for a Safer Economy, requiring that all gatherings with members of other households and all activities conducted outside the residence, lodging, or temporary accommodation with members of other households cease between 10 p.m. PST and 5 a.m. PST, except for those activities associated with the operation, maintenance, or usage of critical infrastructure or required by law. This order shall take effect on November 21, 2020, at 10 p.m. PST and remains in effect until 5 a.m. PST on December 21, 2020. Read the full order here. 
    • California Issues Travel Advisory: The state issued a travel advisory on Friday, November 13, in advance of the holiday season. As COVID-19 transmission is increasing in many states and countries, those arriving, or returning to California, from other states or countries should self-quarantine for 14 days after arrival. During this time, people should limit their interactions to their immediate household. All Californians are encouraged to stay home or in their region and avoid non-essential travel to other states or countries. Read the travel advisory here.
    • On August 28, the State revised their recovery roadmap and created an updated, color-coded Tier Framework that classifies each county based on their daily case rate and positivity rate. This tiered system will guide possible sector reopenings for each county to consider. View the new Blueprint for a Safer Economy. Although the State lists permitted activities in each Tier, it is important to note that the County may be more restrictive than State guidance. The ultimate decisions about sector reopenings will remain under the purview of the local Health Officer Orders that are developed in consultation with the Board of Supervisors.
    • Los Angeles County is currently in Tier 1 (Purple) - meaning that there continues to be widespread transmission of the virus in the county. The current number of new cases per day per 100,000 people is 13.1, nearly double the threshold for this tier which is less than 7 new cases per day per 100,000 population. And even though the County’s current test positivity rate of 5% puts us in Tier 2 (Red) for this metric, when the two metrics fall in different tiers the state places counties in the most restrictive tier. Therefore, the County, like most counties in California, has been placed in Tier 1.
    • Starting June 18, Governor Gavin Newsom is requiring Californians to wear face masks in public. View the full guidance. 
    • On May 4, Governor Gavin Newsom announced that California will be prepared to move into the early phase of Stage 2 of reopening on Friday, May 8 based on the state’s progress in meeting metrics tied to indicators. Stage 2 allows gradual reopening of lower-risk workplaces with adaptations including bookstores, clothing stores, florists and sporting goods stores, with modifications. Other Stage 2 sectors such as offices, dine-in restaurants and shopping malls will be part of a later Stage 2 opening. View the State Reopening Roadmap Report Card here.
    • On April 14, Governor Gavin Newsom outlined six critical indicators the state will consider before modifying the Stay at Home Order. Learn more about the six indicators here.
    • On March 19, Governor Gavin Newsom announced a Stay at Home Order for the state of California: All individuals living in the State of California are to stay home or at their place of residence, except as needed to maintain continuity of operation of the federal critical infrastructure sectors, critical government services, schools, childcare, and construction, including housing construction. More information here.
    • On March 15, Governor Gavin Newsom directed closure of California's bars, brewpubs, wineries and nightclubs, and called on people over 65 and others at higher risk of serious complications from exposure to the virus to stay at home.
    • On March 11, Governor Gavin Newsom announced that California public health officials this evening issued an updated policy on gatherings to protect public health and slow the spread of COVID-19. The state’s public health experts have determined that gatherings should be postponed or canceled across the state until at least the end of March. Non-essential gatherings must be limited to no more than 250 people, while smaller events can proceed only if the organizers can implement social distancing of 6 feet per person. Gatherings of individuals who are at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19 should be limited to no more than 10 people, while also following social distancing guidelines. Read more here.
    United States
    • On May 13, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released guidance indicating that people who are fully vaccinated against COVID-19 can safely resume activities that were done prior to the pandemic.
      • Updates as of May 13:
        • Update that fully vaccinated people no longer need to wear a mask or physically distance in any setting, except where required by federal, state, local, tribal, or territorial laws, rules, and regulations, including local business and workplace guidance
        • Update that fully vaccinated people can refrain from testing following a known exposure unless they are residents or employees of a correctional or detention facility or a homeless shelter
      • L.A. County and the state will review the CDC recommendations in order to make sensible adjustments. In the interim, please note that fully vaccinated people do not need to wear a mask when indoors around other fully vaccinated people, or outside in uncrowded areas. When at businesses and in crowded venues, both indoors and outdoors, masks are still required to be worn by everyone.
      • It remains important to protect workers at all worksites and all worksites must follow the requirements set forth by California’s Division of Occupational Safety and Health, Cal/OSHA. Everyone must continue to adhere to required distancing and masking at all workplaces. Until Cal/OSHA changes these requirements, the County cannot be less restrictive. Proposed changes to Cal/OSHA’s workplace safety standards were posted for consideration at the May 20 standards board meeting.
    • On April 2, the CDC updated their guidance related to travel for those who are fully vaccinated
      • Domestic Travel: 
        • Fully vaccinated travelers are less likely to get and spread COVID-19.
        • People who are fully vaccinated with an FDA-authorized vaccine can travel safely within the United States:
          • Fully vaccinated travelers do not need to get tested before or after travel unless their destination requires it
          • Fully vaccinated travelers do not need to self-quarantine
        • Fully vaccinated travelers should still follow CDC’s recommendations for traveling safely including:
          • Wear a mask over your nose and mouth
          • Stay 6 feet from others and avoid crowds
          • Wash your hands often or use hand sanitizer
      • International Travel: 
        • Fully vaccinated travelers are less likely to get and spread COVID-19. However, international travel poses additional risks and even fully vaccinated travelers are at increased risk for getting and possibly spreading new COVID-19 variants.
        • CDC recommends delaying international travel until you are fully vaccinated.
        • If you are fully vaccinated with an FDA-authorized vaccine:
          • You should continue to follow CDC’s recommendations for traveling safely and get tested 3-5 days after travel.
          • You do NOT need to get tested before leaving United States unless your destination requires it.
          • You do NOT need to self-quarantine after arriving in the United States.
    • After You’ve Been Fully Vaccinated:
      • On March 8, the CDC released guidance for those who are fully vaccinated. People are considered fully vaccinated:
        • 2 weeks after their second dose in a 2-dose series, like the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccines, or
        • 2 weeks after a single-dose vaccine, like Janssen (Johnson & Johnson) vaccine
        • If it has been less than 2 weeks since your shot, or if you still need to get your second dose, you are NOT fully protected. Keep taking all prevention steps until you are fully vaccinated.
      • What’s Changed
        • If you’ve been fully vaccinated:
          • You can gather indoors with fully vaccinated people without wearing a mask.
          • You can gather indoors with unvaccinated people from one other household (for example, visiting with relatives who all live together) without masks, unless any of those people or anyone they live with has an increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19.
          • If you’ve been around someone who has COVID-19, you do not need to stay away from others or get tested unless you have symptoms.
            • However, if you live in a group setting (like a correctional or detention facility or group home) and are around someone who has COVID-19, you should still stay away from others for 14 days and get tested, even if you don’t have symptoms.
      • What Hasn’t Changed
        • For now, if you’ve been fully vaccinated:
          • You should still take steps to protect yourself and others in many situations, like wearing a mask, staying at least 6 feet apart from others, and avoiding crowds and poorly ventilated spaces. Take these precautions whenever you are:
            • In public
            • Gathering with unvaccinated people from more than one other household
            • Visiting with an unvaccinated person who is at increased risk of severe illness or death from COVID-19 or who lives with a person at increased risk
            • You should still avoid medium or large-sized gatherings.
          • You should still delay domestic and international travel. If you do travel, you’ll still need to follow CDC requirements and recommendationsLos Angeles County’s Travel Advisory remains in effect.
          • You should still watch out for symptoms of COVID-19, especially if you’ve been around someone who is sick. If you have symptoms of COVID-19, you should get tested and stay home and away from others.
          • You will still need to follow guidance at your workplace.
      • Learn more here.
    • On March 16, the White House released Coronavirus Guidelines for America:
      • If you feel sick, stay home. Do not go to work or school.
      • If someone in your household has tested positive for COVID-19, keep the entire household home. Do not go to work or school. Contact your medical provider.
      • If you are an older adult or person with a serious underlying health condition, stay home and away from other people
      • Work or engage in schooling FROM HOME whenever possible
      • If you work in a critical infrastructure industry, as defined by the Department of Homeland Security, such as healthcare services and pharmaceutical and food supply, you have a special responsibility to maintain your normal work schedule. You and your employers should follow CDC guidance to protect your health at work.
      • Avoid social gatherings in groups of more than 10 people
      • Avoid eating or drinking at bars, restaurants and food courts - use drive-thru, pick up or delivery options
      • Avoid nonessential travel and activities
      • Do not visit nursing homes, retirement or long-term care facilities unless to provide critical assistance
      • Continue to practice good hygiene
    • On January 31, the Health and Human Services Secretary Alex M. Azar II declared a public health emergency to aid the healthcare community in responding to the coronavirus.
    • The first confirmed instance of person-to-person spread was reported in the U.S. on January 30, 2020.