Public Health Topics
Vaccinations

Vaccinations can prevent you from getting and spreading serious and even deadly diseases.

Vaccinations are not only for children. Adults also need vaccinations as protection from some childhood vaccines can wear off over time. Depending on their age, job, lifestyle, travel or health conditions, adults may be at risk for certain vaccine-preventable diseases.

Below are recommended vaccines by age from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Check with your healthcare professional to find out which vaccines are recommended for you.

AGE VACCINE
Birth
  • Hepatitis B (HepB)
1-2 months
  • Hepatitis B (HepB)
  • Diphtheria, tetanus and whooping cough (pertussis) (DTaP)
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)
  • Polio (IPV)
  • Pneumococcal (PCV)
  • Rotavirus (RV)
4 months
  • Diphtheria, tetanus and whooping cough (pertussis) (DTaP)
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)
  • Polio (IPV)
  • Pneumococcal (PCV)
  • Rotavirus (RV)
  • Hepatitis B (HepB)
6 months
  • Diphtheria, tetanus, and whooping cough (pertussis) (DTaP)
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)
  • Polio (IPV)
  • Pneumococcal (PCV)
  • Rotavirus (RV)
  • Influenza (flu) – children 6 months and older should receive the flu vaccination every flu season
12 – 23 months
  • Chickenpox (Varicella)
  • Diphtheria, tetanus, and whooping cough (pertussis) (DTaP)
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)
  • Measles, mumps, rubella (MMR)
  • Polio (IPV) – between 6 – 18 months
  • Pneumococcal (PCV)
  • Hepatitis A (HepA)
  • Hepatitis B (HepB)
  • Influenza (flu) every year
2 – 3 years
  • Influenza (flu) every year
4 – 6 years
  • Diphtheria, tetanus and whooping cough (pertussis) (DTaP)
  • Polio (IPV)
  • Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR)
  • Chickenpox (varicella)
  • Influenza (flu) every year
7 – 10 years
  • Influenza (flu) every year
11 – 12 years
  • Meningococcal conjugate vaccine
  • HPV vaccine
  • Tdap
  • Influenza (flu) every year
13 – 18 years
  • Influenza (flu) every year
19 – 26 years
  • Influenza (flu) every year
  • Td or Tdap vaccine (tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis)
27 – 60 years
  • Influenza (flu) every year
  • Td (tetanus, diphtheria) booster shot every 10 years
  • Zoster (Shingles) vaccine – for healthy adults aged 50 years and older
60 years or older
  • Influenza (flu) every year
  • Td or Tdap vaccine (tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis)
  • Pneumococcal vaccines
  • Zoster (Shingles) vaccine

Special Considerations for Vaccinations *

Human papillomavirus vaccination (minimum age: 9 years)
Special situations

• Immunocompromising conditions, including HIV infection: 3-dose series as above
• History of sexual abuse or assault: Start at age 9 years
• Pregnancy: HPV vaccination not recommended until after pregnancy; no intervention needed if vaccinated while pregnant; pregnancy testing not needed before vaccination
• Pregnancy through age 26 years: HPV vaccination not recommended until after pregnancy; no intervention needed if vaccinated while pregnant; pregnancy testing not needed before vaccination.

Influenza vaccination (minimum age: 6 months [IIV], 2 years [LAIV], 18 years [recombinant influenza vaccine, RIV])
Special situations

  1. Egg allergy, hives only: Any influenza vaccine appropriate for age and health status annually
  2. Egg allergy with symptoms other than hives (e.g., angioedema, respiratory distress, need for emergency medical services or epinephrine): Any influenza vaccine appropriate for age and health status annually in medical setting under supervision of health care provider who can recognize and manage severe allergic reactions
  3. LAIV should not be used in persons with the following conditions or situations:
    • History of severe allergic reaction to a previous dose of any influenza vaccine or to any vaccine component (excluding egg, see details above)
    • Receiving aspirin or salicylate-containing medications
    • Age 2–4 years with history of asthma or wheezing
    • Immunocompromised due to any cause (including medications and HIV infection)
    • Anatomic or functional asplenia
    • Cochlear implant
    • Cerebrospinal fluid-oropharyngeal communication
    • Close contacts or caregivers of severely immunosuppressed persons who require a protected environment
    • Pregnancy
    • Received influenza antiviral medications within the previous 48 hours

      *Please consult with your health care provider regarding special concerns.


Beach Cities Health District’s Advocacy Statement
Beach Cities Health District strongly recommends that health care providers, individuals, and families follow the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)-recommended vaccination schedules and avoid “alternative” vaccination schedules which often delay vaccinations and leave individuals susceptible to serious, preventable diseases.

Additional Resources:

Information sourced from:
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention